There’s Something in My Eye

In November, I wrote a post entitled “Ma Ee” in which I described how I have had some issues with my eyesight in the past.

In the last two months, I have once again been dealing with problems with my right eye. It started one evening when I suddenly lost most of the vision in the center of my eye and what I could see around the perimeter was like looking through jagged shards of glass.

The hubby, thinking I may be having a stroke, whisked me off the the hospital. The doctor gave me a pill to lower my blood pressure (which is usually VERY low) and after a brief examination of my eye, he told me that he thought that I had a detached retina. FYI – The retina is the light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the inside of the eye and sends visual messages through the optic nerve to the brain. When the retina detaches, it is lifted or pulled from its normal position. If not promptly treated, retinal detachment can cause permanent vision loss. So – not a good thing.

I was told that I would probably have to have emergency eye surgery first thing the following morning. My hubby had to take the day off work and we made the early morning  1 1/2 hour drive down to the city.

It turned out that I did not have a detached retina (thank God)! The specialist thought that what I had experienced was an ocular migraine which didn’t require any treatment.

Two days later, my eye was red, swollen and aching. It felt exactly like it did the last time I had iritis (inflammation of the iris). I popped into the optometrist’s office to see if I could be seen that day or the next. No – they were too busy. I was advised to go to the Emergency Department. I asked if Emerg doctors could prescribe eye drops and was told “Oh yes”.

So off I went to the hospital to go through the whole rigamarole again. The doctor wanted to give me an injection for a migraine. I refused as I knew that I wasn’t having a migraine. Then after an hour of crazy questions he finally told me that I probably had iritis (big surprise) BUT – (wait for it) HE COULDN’T PRESCRIBE THE STEROID DROPS I NEEDED TO TREAT THE PROBLEM! He advised me to try to see the specialist again the following day – although the receptionist thought that the specialist was gone for the long weekend.

I called the optometrist’s office the following day, explained the issue and asked if I could please be seen on the following Tuesday after the long weekend. The receptionist told me that I shouldn’t wait that long and that I could be seen that very afternoon. (Remember – I had been told the previous day that there was NO WAY I could be seen before Tuesday – thus the futile Emergency visit).

So I was finally checked, diagnosed with iritis and prescribed not just one, but three separate medications. The receptionist told me that she was faxing the prescriptions to my pharmacy in a few minutes. I slowly walked around the town and to the pharmacy only to be told that they had not received any faxed prescription.

I called the pharmacy again that evening but they still had not received any fax. By then, the optometrist’s office was closed for the long weekend!

I was unable to get the medication until Tuesday and even then when I went in to pick them up I was told that one of them was no longer being made! I would have to wait until they could reach the optometrist for an alternative. AARGH!

The inflammation in my eye took quite a while to dissipate and while it has finally gone, I have been left with an eye whose vision is like looking through fog filled with millions of tiny particles of soot. This is accompanied by larger black spots on the periphery of my vision – I feel like I have a small swarm of fruit flies constantly buzzing back and forth. And just to make things interesting, there is a long, squiggly, wire-like, black “worm” floater right in the center of my vision.

Yesterday marked the fourth visit to the eye specialist and the news I received made me feel like having a bit of a pity party. Apparently, not only do I have scar tissue on my cornea (from previous infections) which has given me an atypical astigmatism (why can’t I be “typical” for once??), I also have a cataract forming on the lens (thus the fogginess) along with the floating “worm” and “fruit flies”!

We discussed the possibility of having cataract surgery but the specialist felt that due to the high incidence of inflammation in that eye, surgery may actually cause a severe flare up. And as for those annoying floaters – apparently they are permanent!

So to recap – 2 Emergency visits, 4 eye specialist visits, and 2 optometrist visits and I have scar tissue, a damaged iris, a cataract, and floaters. I don’t think that there is any more room in my eye for anything else!

But sometimes, I think that I may have something way more serious than fog and floaters in my eye; something that does not blind my actual vision but which may blind my spiritual one.

The Bible describes it as a “beam”.

Mat 7:3 And why do you look on the splinter that is in your brother’s eye, but do not consider the beam that is in your own eye? 

I know that I can be guilty of judging and criticizing others. I may be doing that at the risk of being hypocritical.

Oh, but isn’t it so much easier to notice the flaws in others than it is to see our own?

The Bible tells us that we must first look at ourselves and remove the offending/offensive parts from ourselves before we look to pointing out how to fix other people’s faults.

Mat 7:5 Hypocrite! First cast the beam out of your own eye, and then you shall see clearly to cast the splinter out of your brother’s eye.

While I pray for the vision to be restored in my right eye, more so I pray that God will help me see the times where there is a “beam” stuck in my spiritual eye.

As for you my readers – “Here’s mud in your eye”. 🙂

Joh 9:6 And when He had spoken these things, He spat on the ground and made clay from the spittle. And He anointed the eyes of the blind man with the clay.

Joh 9:11 He answered and said, A man called Jesus made clay and anointed my eyes and said to me, Go to the pool of Siloam and wash. And going and washing, I received sight.

Blessings

 

 

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“Ma Ee”

When I was a young nurse working in a nursing home, I had an elderly Scottish gentleman for a patient. One shift he became somewhat agitated and when I asked him what was wrong he said, “It’s ‘ma ee’; there is something wrong with ‘ma ee'”. I was not used to a thick Scottish accent and so I thought that he was telling me that there was something wrong with his ear. He got frustrated with me and finally pointed to his eye while loudly explaining “ma ee – ma ee!” Bing – my light bulb went on and I realized that he was saying, “there is something wrong with my eye”! LOL

Well, there has been something wrong with “ma ees” too, ever since I was young.

When I was a toddler, my father, who suffered from frequent bouts of cold sores, ended up passing the virus, herpes simplex, on to me while he was cuddling me. The virus took up residence in my eyes and I ended up with ulcerated corneas.

I remember being very young and going in for surgery to cauterize (burn off) the ulcers. I can still remember the smell of the rubber mask they put on me for the gas to put me to sleep. I had a patch on my eye and I wasn’t supposed to let any light in. I ended up with a nasty, itchy reaction on my face due to the surgical tape.

Another time, I woke up from a nap with pools of blood in my eyes from blood vessels that had burst for some reason. I remember a horrible episode in the emergency room while nurses held down my arms and legs while they cauterized the blood vessels – without anesthetic!

I continued to have bouts of herpes simplex infections in my eyes requiring lots of eye drops – ooh sting! And there were a few visits to the opthalmologist where my eye would be “frozen” and then a liquid would be used to remove the ulcers.

The subsequent result was that I developed scar tissue on my cornea, over the lens, which caused some vision loss.

I remember the opthalmologist commenting that if I had continued to have frequent infections, I may have become blind in that eye by the time I turned 18. That was NOT good news.

When I was 16, I suddenly developed a different type of infection called iritis, which is an inflammation in iris muscles of the eye. My vision in that eye turned milky white and my pupil took on a figure 8 shape. A subsequent bout of iritis has caused permanent damage to the iris so it does not allow the pupil to respond to light properly.

I tell you all this so that you will understand why I value my eyesight so much!

I love being outdoors. I love the beauty of God’s creation. I love to paint and do handicrafts. I love photography. I love to read. I love to go for country drives. And I love to look at the faces of my loved ones. All of these things depend on vision and that is why I am so glad that I can still see.

I often thank God for my eyesight. I feel closest to God when I am looking at His creation. I have been mightily blessed by the beauty I have seen. Sometimes, it has taken my breath away in amazement; other times, it has made me weep with joy.

This morning, as I was driving my hubby to work, the sun was rising and glowing through the low-lying mist. Shafts of golden light burst through. The trees were in silhouette against a misty golden backdrop. The green winter wheat was covered with a carpet of glistening diamonds. It was both awe inspiring and peaceful at the same time.

And I once again thanked my Heavenly Father for my eyesight.

Take some time to look at the beauty around you and then remember to thank God that you can see it.

Blessings

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